Wednesday, 3 June 2015

Spiral Galaxy M106 in Canes Venatici Fleece Blanket

A gorgeous best-selling design. Click to customize or personalize. How would it look with your name or monogram on it - why not have a look-see right now?

tagged with: star galaxies, constellation canes venatici, spiral galaxies, spiral arms, spiral galaxy picture, outer space picture, supermassive black hole, hunting dog stars, hrbstslr m106cv, hubble galaxy pictures, messier 106, seyfert ii galaxy

Galaxies, Stars and Nebulae series: A fabulous fleece blanket with sleepful image. Messier 106 (also known as NGC 4258) is a spiral galaxy in the constellation Canes Venatici. It was discovered by Pierre Méchain in 1781. M106 is at a distance of about 22 to 25 million light-years away from Earth. It is also a Seyfert II galaxy, which means that due to x-rays and unusual emission lines detected, it is suspected that part of the galaxy is falling into a supermassive black hole in the center.
more items with this image
more items in the Galaxies, Stars and Nebulae series

image code: m106cv

Image credit: NASA, ESA, the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA), and R. Gendler (for the Hubble Heritage Team), J. GaBany

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Artist Sean Yoro Paints Meticulous Seaside Murals While Balancing on His Paddle Board

Fun and Random


Riding atop a paddle board, artist Sean Yoro (aka Hula), paints murals while floating on the waves, placing his works just above sea level. The murals, all portraits of women, have a hyperrealistic quality that appear as if each is existing just above the tide. Due to the works’ position above the water they reflect perfectly into the waves, the image extending out far from the painted surface.

The NYC-based artist paddles out to paint the murals, balancing his acrylic paint on his board all the while. Hula grew up on the island of Oahu, where he spent most of his days in the ocean. Although he grew up dabbling in graffiti, watercolor, and tattoo art, he didn’t take his work seriously until he began to paint the the human body when he was 21. Hula also uses cracked surfboards as a surface to paint his female portraits, more of which you can see on his Instagram, @the_hula. (via Street Art News)

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Delicate Glass Sea Life Sculptures by Emily Williams

Fun and Random

Glass Seaweed, 2014, Flameworked borosilicate glass, 20″ x 20″ x 20″

American artist Emily Williams draws inspiration from the sea and other aspects of organic life for the creation of her fragile glass sculptures that mimic seaweed, jellyfish, and coral. Each piece begins with a selection of perfectly straight borosilicate glass rods in various diameters which she carefully melts with a glass torch to form patterns similar to veins and branches.

As a child, Williams’ grandmother was a docent at the Smithsonian leading to many artistic and scientific discoveries at a very young age that would deeply influence her decision to pursue an artistic career. She went on to receive her MFA in sculpture from Washington University in St. Louis and a BFA in sculpture from V.C.U. in Richmond. She is currently working on an impressive glass coral piece shown in the video below (and discussed in this blog post), and you can see more views of her work both on Facebook and in her portfolio.

Glass Seaweed, detail

Coral Skeleton
Glass Coral Skeleton, 2013, Flameworked borosilicate glass, 20″ x 22″ x 10″

Coral Skeleton_DetailCoral Skeleton, detail

Glass Nest
Glass Nest, 2013, Flameworked borosilicate glass, 15″ x 20″ x 20″

Glass Jellyfish, 2013, Flameworked borosilicate glass, 15″ x 14″ x 14″

Glass Petal, 2013, Flameworked borosilicate glass, 15″ x 12″ x 4″

Petal, detail

Burst, 2013, Flameworked borosilicate glass, 12″ x 10″ x 10″

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