Saturday, 10 January 2015

Monograms on rich decorative frame for Couple Paper Napkin

Featured Product!

A gorgeous design. Click to customize and personalize. Maybe you'd like to see your name or initials on it?


tagged with: elegance, rdf1, monogram initials, couples initials, rich reds, elegant monograms, golden browns, decorative frame, swirly style, hrfptraz

Elegance series A gorgeous and elegant design made to hold a couple's or individual's monogram initials. The frame is decorative and contrast beautifully with the background that's rendered in deep, rich reds and golden browns. Perfect for the newly engaged or married or just as personal statement to enrich the home.
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image code: rdf1

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Stellar Nursery R136 in the Tarantula Nebula Wristlet Purse

A gorgeous best-selling design. Click to customize or personalize. How would it look with your name or monogram on it - why not have a look-see right now?


tagged with: galaxies, astronomy, stellar nursery, 30 doradus nebula, massive stars, hrbstslr dorneblmc, amazing hubble images, tarantula nebula, cosmological stars, cosmological, r136, large magellanic cloud, star cluster

Galaxies, Stars and Nebulae series Hundreds of brilliant blue stars wreathed by warm, glowing clouds in appear in this the most detailed view of the largest stellar nursery in our local galactic neighborhood. The massive, young stellar grouping, called R136, is only a few million years old and resides in the 30 Doradus (or Tarantula) Nebula, a turbulent star-birth region in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), a satellite galaxy of our Milky Way.
There is no known star-forming region in our galaxy as large or as prolific as 30 Doradus. Many of the diamond-like icy blue stars are among the most massive stars known. Several of them are over 100 times more massive than our Sun. These hefty stars are destined to pop off, like a string of firecrackers, as supernovas in a few million years. The image, taken in ultraviolet, visible, and red light by Hubble's Wide Field Camera 3, spans about 100 light-years.
The movement of the LMC around the Milky Way may have triggered the massive cluster's formation in several ways. The gravitational tug of the Milky Way and the companion Small Magellanic Cloud may have compressed gas in the LMC. Also, the pressure resulting from the LMC plowing through the Milky Way's halo may have compressed gas in the satellite. The cluster is a rare, nearby example of the many super star clusters that formed in the distant, early universe, when star birth and galaxy interactions were more frequent.
The LMC is located 170,000 light-years away and is a member of the Local Group of Galaxies, which also includes the Milky Way. The Hubble observations were taken Oct. 20-27, 2009. The blue color is light from the hottest, most massive stars; the green from the glow of oxygen; and the red from fluorescing hydrogen.

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image code: dorneblmc

Image credit: Hubble's Wide Field Camera 3

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Get Well Soon - Stellar Group, Tarantula Nebula Cards

A gorgeous best-selling design. Click to customize or personalize. How would it look with your name or monogram on it - why not have a look-see right now?


tagged with: astronomy, get well soon, speedy recovery, hurry home, stellar nursery, r136, tarantula nebula, amazing hubble images, star galaxies, hrbstslr dorneblmc, massive stars, large magellanic cloud, star cluster, 30 doradus nebula

Galaxies, Stars and Nebulae series Hundreds of brilliant blue stars wreathed by warm, glowing clouds in appear in this the most detailed view of the largest stellar nursery in our local galactic neighborhood. The massive, young stellar grouping, called R136, is only a few million years old and resides in the 30 Doradus (or Tarantula) Nebula, a turbulent star-birth region in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), a satellite galaxy of our Milky Way.
There is no known star-forming region in our galaxy as large or as prolific as 30 Doradus. Many of the diamond-like icy blue stars are among the most massive stars known. Several of them are over 100 times more massive than our Sun. These hefty stars are destined to pop off, like a string of firecrackers, as supernovas in a few million years. The image, taken in ultraviolet, visible, and red light by Hubble's Wide Field Camera 3, spans about 100 light-years.
The movement of the LMC around the Milky Way may have triggered the massive cluster's formation in several ways. The gravitational tug of the Milky Way and the companion Small Magellanic Cloud may have compressed gas in the LMC. Also, the pressure resulting from the LMC plowing through the Milky Way's halo may have compressed gas in the satellite. The cluster is a rare, nearby example of the many super star clusters that formed in the distant, early universe, when star birth and galaxy interactions were more frequent.
The LMC is located 170,000 light-years away and is a member of the Local Group of Galaxies, which also includes the Milky Way. The Hubble observations were taken Oct. 20-27, 2009. The blue color is light from the hottest, most massive stars; the green from the glow of oxygen; and the red from fluorescing hydrogen.
more items with this image
more items in the Galaxies, Stars and Nebulae series

image code: dorneblmc

Image credit: Hubble's Wide Field Camera 3

»visit the HightonRidley store for more designs and products like this

Cute Christmas Havanese Puppy Dog Postage Stamps

Cute Alert!

How can you resist this cute puppy design? Maybe you'd like to see your name or initials on it? Click to customize and personalize...


tagged with: adorable, animal, attractive, babe, baby, beautiful, bichon, black, camera, cap, card, charming, christmas, claus, cool, cushion, cute, dog, facing, friend, friendly, front, funny, greeting, hat, havanais, havanese, holiday, infant, isolated, lie-abed, longhair, looking, lovely, lying, male, mini, nice, pet, playful, portrait, puppy, red, reddish, santa, small, studio, sweet, tassel, white, xmas, young

Cute Bichon Havanese puppy dog in Christmas - Santa hat is lying on a red cushion. Isolated on a white background © and ® Bigstock® - All Rights Reserved.

»visit the happyholidays store for more designs and products like this
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SEO: The Must-Dos That You Just Can’t Miss

Blogging with purpose

original post »

Last year, we had Rand Fishkin sort us out with a comprehensive post on SEO basics, tips, and tricks. If you haven’t thought much about SEO and the traffic it can bring your blog, now would be the time to do it! Get into the right habits at the start of the year, and they’ll become second-nature.


 

We welcome Rand Fishkin to the ProBlogger Theme Week today to talk us through all things SEO. While this week we’re exploring all the things you can do with a post after you hit “publish”, Rand is reminding is to take a second before we do and have a look at the things you can do to optimize your post before it even gets into the hands of your readers.

For days, you’ve been agonizing over this post. The hours of guilt for not starting it sooner, the toil of finding the right topic, the relentless editing and re-editing, and now, at long last, the publish button is there, tempting you to end the struggle and at last declare this tiny battle over.

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(above: the blogger’s tantalizer, teaser, needler, and tormenter)

If you give in to that sweet release, it will feel good, at least for a little while. But in the months and years to come, you’ll look back at that post and, perhaps in revery, read it again, and think to yourself:

“That was a really excellent post I published. Why has it had so little success?”

It started so well. The post had some retweets on Twitter. It got shared and liked a few times on Facebook. Maybe it even got a bit of traffic from Google+ or Pinterest. But, then, the traffic stopped. Your post wasn’t “new” anymore, and the web world, it seemed, no longer cared for something more than 24 hours ago. In fact, the data backs this up – social sharing half-lives across networks are <7 hours.


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There is another way.

The vast majority of content consumed on the web isn’t actually found through social media. In fact, the largest driver of traffic to web content (outside of direct navigation) is still the same source it was 3, 5, and 10 years ago, and remarkably, in spite (or perhaps in part because) of the rise of social & mobile, this source is still growing.

You’ll probably recognize it:

google-search-box

Search, and Google in particular (with 90% of worldwide share), still drive vastly greater quantities of traffic than all the social networks combined (some good research from DefineMG here). Given Google’s 3.5+ Billion searches performed each day, that shouldn’t be a surprise, but to many bloggers, thinking about search, Google, and all that “SEO stuff” has been put aside in favor of Facebook shares, likes, tweets, +1s, and the more visible feedback and applause that come from social sources.

That bias is understandable – a visit from a Google search doesn’t have a fancy embeddable counter you can show off. 30,000 visits a month from search engines doesn’t carry nearly the same social proof that 30,000 Twitter followers does.

But, it should.

The vast majority of visitors who come via social have a browsing-focused intent. They’re looking for something interesting, distracting, temporal, and, only rarely, directly or immediately applicable to an activity that will lead to them accomplishing the goals you’re hoping for on your website (a subscription to your posts, a following of your social accounts, purchasing your products, etc).

On the other hand, searchers know exactly what they want and when they want it – right now. Almost no searches are entirely serendipitous, but most every social visit is entirely so. A searcher is seeking to find information, accomplish a task, or transact in some way right this minute. That’s why they performed a query. If your blog post (and your website, more broadly) helps them achieve this goal, the value of that visit to both parties can be fantastic.

Here’s the tragedy:

When you look over those past posts, you might realize that yes, dammit! It’s time to do some SEO! No more ignoring Google, Bing, Yahoo, and the rest. But, sadly, that ship has probably sailed. One of the harsh truths of blog-focused SEO is that a few hours after a post is published, 90%+ of the ranking ability is spent. Sure, you could go back and tweak some titles, language use, or even URLs (depending on your CMS), but those don’t have a good chance of helping the post perform moving forward.

It’s that first burst of activity – of social sharing and people emailing it around and links coming in – that set the stage for ranking success in the search engines. The words, particularly the title, of the post are how others will describe it when they share, link, tweet, and pin. Those words are strong signals to search engines of how and whether to include your page in the search results. Likeiwse, the first few hours are when you’re most likely to earn that attention and awareness of potential linkers. Links are still a huge part of how search engine algorithms rank pages, and without them, you’ll usually struggle to perform. Both of these are short-lived opportunities on which you need to execute if you’re going to have SEO success with your blog.

Thankfully, you can resolve to make this a priority in the future. It may sound like a bad infomercial, but you can substantially upgrade your blog’s SEO potential with less than 5 minutes per post. Here’s how:

  • Step 1: Keyword Research
  • Step 2: Post Title & Body Content Inclusion
  • Step 3: A Teensy Bit of Proactive Outreach

Step 1: Keyword Research

Earning additional search visits from the content your blog produces over a long streth means ranking for a keyword term or phrase that gets at least a few queries each month. You probably don’t want to tackle competitive phrases where you’ve got little chance to rank on page 1, but you also don’t want to to be ranking brilliantly for a search term no one ever types. In general, phrases with fewer searches are going to be less competitive (if you want to get more data-driven about analyzing the relative difficulty of ranking for a keyword, there’s a tool for that).

Google’s Keyword Planner Tool is still the best one out there to show relative volume levels. Here’s what it looks like:

adwords-kw-planner1

I plugged in a few possible searches related to the post you’re reading now (which is, in a very meta way, about doing SEO for blog posts). The suggestions you see above are what Google’s keyword tool returned. They expanded on a few of my ideas and showed me some terms I wouldn’t have otherwise thought to put in. But, before we go further, there’s four important points to be wary of when you’re looking at the Keyword Planner:

adwords-kw-planner2

A) These aren’t ALL the terms and phrases Google knows are related to your keyword(s). For whatever reason, they’re not comprehensive and, on any given search, may omit numerous good options. This is why it pays to refine and rerun once or twice, and to expand your brainstorm list of terms. It’s also why I’ll suggest using another methodology in combination with Keyword Planner below.

B) The numbers you see are not accurate. We’ve seen them show numbers that are 1/4 of the actual searches for a term and we’ve seen them show 4X the real figure. What is useful are the relative quantities. If Keyword Planner says term XYZ gets twice the searches that term ABC gets, you can be fairly sure that XYZ > ABC. Don’t panic about choosing a term with only 10 or 20 searches/month. These low numbers are actually where we see the least competition and the least accuracy from Google in under-reporting real volume.

C) This “competition” does not refer to how hard it might be to rank in the organic results for a given keyword. Keyword Planner is showing a competition level that’s related to AdWords bids and how many campaigns are targeting these terms. Don’t be too discouraged if it says “medium” or “high” as the organic results won’t always reflect what the paid ads do.

D) Likewise, the cost column can be mostly ignored when thinking about SEO. The one area it can be helpful is to provide a sense of how transactional in nature the search query is, and the value of that traffic to others. If you’re thinking about offering ads on your blog, for example, you might want to note how much advertisers are paying to be in front of searchers for a keyword related to your topic(s).

The other keyword research source I’d encourage you to pursue is Google’s autosuggest. It often illuminates keyword ideas that you may not have seen through AdWords Planner. In fact, some of the best terms and phrases to target are those Keyword Planner hasn’t listed, but autosuggest does (this is because many other SEO-focused content creators have likely missed them).

blog-seo-autosuggest
Start typing, but don’t hit enter!

Step 2: Post Title & Body Content Inclusion

Once you’ve found a few keywords that might work, modify your blog post’s title to include it if you can. For example, when I started drafting this post, I titled it “Publish Now And 1000s of Visits Will Be Forever Lost.” It had a catch and it matched the tone I was aiming for with the piece, but it didn’t target any of those lovely keywords that can help it potentially earn visits for years to come. So I thought up three more:

  1. Publish Your Blog Post Without SEO, and 1000s of Visits Will Be Forever Lost
  2. Your Amazing Blog Post – SEO = 1000s of Lost Visits
  3. These Simple SEO Blogging Tips Will Save You 1000s of Lost Visits

Even though I don’t like #3, it’s probably the best optimized title (note that Google is pretty smart these days about interpreting modifications of words like “blog” and “blogging” that have the same meaning/intent). But, that doesn’t mean I’ll choose it. As I noted above, a lot of a post’s potential success is based on its ability to get in front of the right eyeballs. A title that’s optimized for keyword placement but doesn’t resonate with social sharers and potential linkers isn’t worth compromising for. Instead, I’d go with #1 or #2 and I happened to like #1 just a bit better.

The only other part of this step is to make sure the post itself has at least a mention or two of the target keyword phrase and is actually about that topic (nothing infuriates searchers more than discovering a page ranking in Google that’s not actually about what they wanted – and those user/usage metrics will, eventually, hurt your rankings).

Step 3: A Teensy Bit of Proactive Outreach

Chances are that when writing your post, you mentioned someone, used a graphic or image from somewhere else, linked to some reference-worthy content on another site, or called out a service or organization in some way. If you believe there’s any chance that they (the referenced party) would be interested in reading what you’ve written about them, don’t be shy – let them know.

Twitter makes this incredibly easy (and Google+, too, for those of you using that service). In this post, for example, I referenced a study from Bit.ly, some search stats from Statcounter, and a great post from Define Media Group. Immediately upon hitting publish, I should tweet, G+, and/or email all three of them and say thanks, making sure to point them in the direction of this post. Maybe they’ll share it, maybe they won’t, but they’ll know I appreciate their work, and that goodwill might be valuable in the future, too.

Likewise, if I know there’s a few people in my network or among those that I follow/interact with on social media or the offline world who might benefit from or enjoy this post, I should drop them a line, too.

This might be 30 seconds of thinking about who to contact and another 2 minutes sending the messages, but the reward for that effort could mean the difference between a post that spreads, earns links, and ranks, and one that falls into the tragic “Flatline of Nope.”

———–

A few last pieces of advice:

  • Don’t worry too much about targeting a keyword phrase in more than one post. If at first you don’t succeed, try again! Google has no penalty for a blog that publishes 3-4 posts all chasing the same keyword. The only time I might not do this is if you’re already ranking very well for a term/phrase, in which case, I’d consider updating the old post vs. writing a completely new one.
  • Updating & re-publishing can be a super power! If you’ve got a post that did well, but didn’t quite make it to the first page of results, consider revising it, adding in the most modern information, and publishing a new post to replace the old one. You can use a 301 redirect or rel=canonical tag to point search engines from the old version to the new one.
  • If you need inspiration for titles or content in niches where you think there’s just nothing exciting to write about, I can’t recommend Buzzsumo enough. Give the tool a spin with a few searches related to your potential topics and you’ll see what I mean.
  • Not every post needs to be or should be SEO-targeted. Writing for your audience, for yourself, or simply to court serendipity is a wonderful thing. But every few posts (or at least every few dozen), think about all those poor souls who are searching and finding none of your amazing work – do it for them :-)

p.s. A couple years ago, I created a presentation centered around my love for bloggers and blogging entitled: How to Earn Traffic Without Selling Your Soul. If you’re worried that SEO means sacrificing the beauty of your work, check it out – it may just restore your faith that the two can live in harmony.

Originally at: Blog Tips at ProBlogger
Build a Better Blog in 31 Days

SEO: The Must-Dos That You Just Can’t Miss

Build a Better Blog in 31 Days

SEO: The Must-Dos That You Just Can’t Miss

New Meticulously Cut Paper Illustrations by Maude White

Fun and Random

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New York-based artist Maude White (previously) continues to create beautifully rendered illustrations with cut paper, creating dozens of new pieces since we explored her work this summer. White relies heavily on thin lines and negative space to create each illustration, a subtractive process with no room for error; a single bad cut could be fatal to a piece. Her latest series titled What’s Left on the Farm involves portraits of women with objects in their hair.

White currently has work in an exhibition at Peter & Mary Ann Vogt Gallery in Buffalo, and you can read a recent interview with her over on Artvoice. (via Hi-Fructose)

 
#funandrandom 
 » see original post http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/colossal/~3/dIRrr2oA6ZQ/

Zazzle product grid content: Dynamic V Static - an evaluation

I recently had some correspondence with a fellow Zazzler about promoting. He's just starting to feel his way into a more business-focused approach and taking seriously the promoting of his Zazzle store and products.

Our back and forth turned to a discussion around the pros and cons of static and dynamic (feed generated) content.

I hunted around for an example of a site using dynamically created content from Zazzle and found this really gorgeous site called ButterflysAreBlooming. Please have a look, not only for the lovely designs but so I've got somewhere to use as an example for my comparison.

What am I comparing this against? Well, I've got a bee in my bonnet about the new Personalization Panel feature of SeeMyBest Pro. This is partly because of the amazing "stickiness" you get on the pages / blog posts you can get from it. By Stickiness, I mean that people end up spending time interacting with the page and tend to like coming back. Here's the example of a static content page, the one I'll be using as I compare (the personalization panel and product grid are what was created by SMB Pro, I just pasted the html it gave me).

In the end, I conclude that a mix of both dynamic and static is probably best.

In this comparison, I'm ignoring how 'pretty' both are, and am just looking at the various benefits and dis-benefits of the two approaches. My day job is as a business analyst and this would be how I would tackle it with that "hat" on.

Dynamic web pages

http://butterflysareblooming.com/
ButterflysAreBlooming

  • Debra's ButterflysAreBlooming site (and similar sites such as those built with the Zazzle Store Builder - ZSB). This uses what is known as a "feed-driven" product grid.
    1. Dynamic product grid used (feed-driven). Different products may be shown next visit because of popularity etc changes. Prices shown are always correct.
    2. Great product zoom feature (doesn't work on mobile),
    3. Ability to move easily to next page of displayed products
    4. The fact that Debra doesn't show product titles is a choice she made, so ignore their absence. Doesn't really matter because the search engine spiders have real trouble munching on feeds right now (and this will likely continue for years - they have no real incentive to do anything about it because, being a feed it MUST just duplicate what's elsewhere.)
    5. No tracking codes - feeds don't give you them "out of the box". You have to write code to add them. Downside is that without tracking codes you can't measure successes (dreadful place to be from the perspective of promoting. Imagine going to your marketing boss and s/he says "Right, you had a budget of 40 hours to spend. Did you spend it wisely or do I need to sack you and get someone who can?" And you say "Dunno, I didn't track any sales". Will you have a job tomorrow? No and no need to guess why!
      All us Zazzlers run businesses. The serious ones apply business principles as best they can in a continuous improvement cycle. The non-serious ones don't and fall by the wayside sooner or later.
    6. Suffers from people who spam their product tags and descriptions (feeds from the Z market place (i.e. not a named store) that are based on searches can be fooled by such tag/description spammers and you can end up with inappropriate stuff being displayed - not always a downside, I guess, but I don't like it.)

Static Web Pages

http://www.kdl.to/departments/fashion%20accessories/monogrammed%20wristlet%20clutch%20bags.html
Karmani Designer Lifestyle - Monogram Wristlet Clutch Bags

  • SeeMyBest Pro's approach (product grid with personalisation panel)
    1. Static pages (if it's specifc to SMB Pro's output, I'll say so)
      • Prices, if you choose to show them, won't update
        - though when you Pin on Pinterest the Rich Pin aspect of SMB Pro's output ensures Pinterest shows the right price, even if you choose not to show them in your product grid
      • Great for the search engine spiders who have no trouble reading the product titles (and descriptions, if you choose to show them (config option in SMB Pro)
        • lots of lovely, yummy food to slurp up
        • they can't deduce it's a duplicate of what's elsewhere like they can with feed-driven content, so your page gets some SEO benefit.
        • I know this because, with static pages, I get to use Google Analytics and see people who have searched on Google, Bing and others coming to my pages.
      • Huge advantage of SMB Pro's static product grid - behind the scenes, all products use a thing called schema.org product markup (I have to do that to make the Pinterest pins "rich"). Google, Bing etc. love schema.org markup because it helps their spiders "understand" the product info on the page
      • The downside is static pages don't ever change unless you take manual action.
        • Rubbish for iPhone etc cases over a long period. This is because new models will come in and, unless you do something about it, they won't appear in your product grid.
        • There's no real harm, though, as they can just drift to the bottom of search engine results - the page will still get some long-tail results (few per month but over the lifetime of your web site, it adds up)

Other features of SMB Pro, while I'm at it

    1. In-built template text replacement feature.
    2. Provides for different tracking codes for different places the links appear / can be shared
    3. There's no automatic pagination of results - only one page, if that's all you make for a particular niche product / design. If you make more, you have to provide the navigation between them somehow.
    4. Doesn't suffer from tag / description spamming because you hand-select each and every product.
    5. Easy to make collections because of the hand-selection (like a complete set of stationery for a wedding, all with the same design) Brilliant with the personalisation panel!
    6. Leveraging (one action by you leading to a cascade effect) is in-built through the pin / sharing buttons - your referral id and tracking code are included in all pins / repins / shares / reshares. It's trackable down to which one was used and from which page / sharing location. This is because you do that during configuration for the page (great defaults are in place already to help you).

Overall conclusion (as it affects me)

  • I could build a tool to do what Debra's site achieves - pretty much do have that already with SeeMyBest's dynamic page builder feature (free and pro version of SMB)
  • I could therefore do either A or B but choose B because of the SEO aspects, the personalization panel (for sticky pages) and the additional intelligence I get with Google Analytics. You can still get some info from a dynamic page the same way, but because the spiders aren't seeing the dynamic content, it's not nearly as helpful to help in 'tuning' your promotion efforts.
Remember, there's presently a fully-functioning free trial version of SeeMyBest Pro for you to have a play with. See the Zazzle tools forum for how to get access.